Tomato Veranda Red

Veranda Red

Bred in Britain, the patio tomato packed with flavour!

There is nothing better than picking a tomato that you have grown yourself! Especially when it tastes as good as the Veranda Red.

As tomato plants go, it doesn’t get much better than the Veranda Red. Taking 15 years to perfect, this plant was truly a labour of love. However, now it’s here and it’s ready to rock your cherry tomato world!

Growing tomato plants can be tricky however, the Veranda Red has some extra helpful bonuses to make it much easier to grow! For example, it has some blight resistance which means it fairs well against pesky diseases.

Conversely, this tomato plant is also resistant to fusarium and verticillium, which are a warm weather disease and a disease more prevalent in cooler climates respectively. Due to its resistance properties, you’ll have a great experience growing this tomato plant.

How does it taste?

What we’re all here for, the taste. Well, the Veranda Red has all the amazing tastes you would expect from a juicy cherry tomato. Once ripe, around mid-July, these tomatoes taste sweet and very refreshing! Perfect for summer salads whilst sat in the garden or the local park enjoying warm summer evenings.

Veranda Red is special because dwarf tomatoes are notoriously lacking in flavour and not that nice tasting, whereas Veranda Red has the flavour of a vine tomato you would grow in your greenhouse, BUT on a small plant.

Don’t just take our word for it… The Veranda Red was rated much higher than other varieties in taste tests!

How do I grow tomato plants?

Growing your own is more than just being self-sufficient. It’s about growing varieties that are not readily available in shops and supermarkets, varieties that may not lend themselves to being produced on a mass commercial scale, but ones that taste amazing.

Here are some helpful tomato growing tips. Plant firmly, placing the ball of roots and soil about 25mm (1″) below the surface of the fresh compost. In beds or border, space the plants about 45cm (18″) apart, with rather wider spacing between the rows. Growing tomatoes in pots means they will eventually need more water but the soil must never become waterlogged.

Tomato Plant Care

Once flowers begin to appear, the plants should be fed with a liquid tomato fertilizer at the recommended rate weekly. The growing point should be removed when five or six trusses have formed, as this will encourage the fruits to swell more rapidly and mature more quickly.

Keep the plants well-watered, especially when the fruits have started to set. Wide fluctuations in moisture supply may lead to irregular fruit growth, cracking of the skin, and dropping of the fruits.

Basically, it’s all about bringing the flavour of greenhouse cordon tomatoes into a small, easy to care for plant without the hassle of training the plant or needing a greenhouse.